How You Make The Sale

This book is about how to make successful sales. Unlike many sales books which focus on the salesperson against the customer (one wins one loses) this books takes more of a win-win approach.

  • Selling is not a black art
    • The more ethical and customer focused you are, the more successful you will be in the long term
  • Chapter 1: Selling as Service
    • Together the two of you are walking toward a solution that addresses the customers problem and puts a living wage in your pocket. You are colleagues not competitors. Never forget this essential fact
    • Listen carefully to the customer
    • Clarify the customers wants and needs
    • Determine the problem the customer is trying to solve
    • Know your own product lines (and your competitors)
    • Present the solution so the customer sees and appreciates the benefits of the solution
    • Help the customer complete the transaction
    • Follow-up after the sale
    • Honest customers and buyers make rational economic choices based on the facts as they understand them. If you can educate customers about the facts you have an excellent chance of making the sale
  • Chapter 2: How Buyers Decide to Buy
    • People buy to solve a problem
    • A problem of some sort (perceived or actual) sends a prospective buyer into the market every time.
    • Real problems are usually easy to identify-there's no much question about the problem the customer is trying to solve or the need that must be met.
    • The product selection is about function but it's also about statement, image, self-concept, and one's public face to the world.
    • "shirt sleeve" products…those customers use in plain view of others (brand name is important)
    • Customers are less likely to own up to their needs for prestige and status-find these through careful observation and judicious reading between the lines
    • Always buying to solve a problem….the problem may be real, it may be perceived, or it may be a mix of the two, but customers always buy to solve a problem.
    • The Path to Purchase
      • Identify need
        • Real or perceived
      • Gather data
        • What products are available, what do they do, how have other people met their needs and solved similar problems?
      • Clarify need
        • Become more precise about what is needed and why
      • Identify options that fulfill need
        • What specific products will meet my need and solve my problems
      • Develop purchase criteria
        • How much can I spend, when do I need to take delivery, what are other key purchase determinants that will drive this purchase
      • Identify potential sources
        • Who has the products I need? Where are they located, is proximity an issue, how about service after the sale? Among my circle of acquaintances who has a recommendation I might follow
      • Contact or visit potential sources
        • What is the feel of this place? Is this a place I think I could do business
      • Interview potential salespeople
        • Is this person credible with me? Do I trust them? Do we connect?
      • Select preferred outlet and salesperson
        • Of all the places I have visited is this the one I want to do business with
  • Chapter 3: How Does a Sale Unfold
    • The Sales Process
      • Research prior to the sale
        • How does my product compare to its competitors
        • How do customers use my product
        • What problems-real or perceived-does my product solve
        • Learn the features and benefits of out product. We understand the typical customer problems. Learn how to present our product as the solution to those problems
        • Have to know our competitors products at least as well as we know our own
          • What are the strengths and weakness of of the competitive product versus the product we represent?
          • When people buy from competitors why and how often are they disappointed
        • Do your research prior to the sale
      • Meet and greet
        • How do I greet customers in way that buyers see me as a credible colleague?
        • How do I build rapport
        • How do I get customers to invite me into their problem solving process
      • Discovery
        • How do I discover the problems that drove the customer into the market
        • How do I uncover the key purchase criteria that will drive this sale
        • How do I elp the customer clarify his problem
        • How do I identify solutions that will best solve the newly clarified problem
        • How do I discover the benefits of my product that are most relevant to this buyer
        • Prospective customer's understanding of the problem
        • Then discovery is where you begin to fully understand the problem and the customers expectation of what it will take to solve the problem
        • Match your product up against the problem
        • Name the problem. And you can't solve a problem you can't name.
      • Features and benefits
        • How do I product, program or service in a way that I full bridge from th features I have learned to the benefits that the customer cares about?
        • Talk about your product, program, or service. You detail for the customer the features of your product and bridge to the benefits that acrue because of that feature. You also need to get the prospective customer's agreement that the benefits you have detailed actually matter to the buyer.
        • Talk about the product in a way that matters to the prospective customer.
      • Making the case/presentation the solution
        • How do I present the solution to the customer's problem
        • How do I use a trial close to flush out objections so I can deal with them
        • Make the case that our product can solve the customers problem better than any other option available.
        • Solve it better than anyone else.
        • We listen to the prospective customers concerns and misgivings. We deal with those concerns and misgivings by addressing them not by explaining them away. Checking with the buyer to make sure we are speaking to their needs and not just to our own need to hear ourselves talk.
      • The objective is objections: dealing with resistance
        • How do I respond when the customer objects to my presentation
        • How do I remember that "an objection is simply a request for more information"
        • How do I circle back to discovery to uncover the additional facts I need to solve the customer's problem and make this sale?
        • An objection seldom means no. It most often means "tell me more" request for more information
        • We meet the objection by providing whatever additional information the prospective customer seeks and checking in to see if we have addressed his concerns. We make the case once again that our product provides the customer with the very best solution to the problem that sent them into the market place
      • Closing: it's okay to ask for the order
        • How can I ask for the order in a way that is congruent with our collegial sales model?
        • How do we finalized our commitments to each other in a professional way
        • Once you have flushed out and dealt with each of the objections-look the buyer in the eye and say "well what do you think? Should we do business together?
      • Following up for ongoing profitability
        • How do I follow up for an on going profitable relationship
        • What other problems can I solve for this customer
        • How do I stay in contact to make this customer a customer for life
        • That it costs nineteen times as much to acquire a new customer as to keep a current customer
        • Follow up sales and seek referrals to other buyers whom your satisfied customer might know. Service the heck out of this new customer so that you don't quickly lose the customer you worked so hard to gain.
      • The customer is apt to say almost anything in response to your first comment and your second comment has to be tailored to his first comment. So scripting is futile
      • Alice in wonderland: " which way should I go? That depends-where are you trying to go? I don’t really know? Well then it doesn't really matter which road you take
      • If you don't know where you are going, you'll probably wind up somewhere else
      • Pay attention to the customer and monitor our own behavior in the sales interaction we can almost always tell where we are in the sales process. And where we are usually determines what we ought to do next.
      • If you don't know what you are trying to do, you won't know when you have done it.
      • If you skip a step in the sales process you are going to miss the sale.
      • Remember to talk only about the features and benefits that truly matter to this customer. Don't give him oa laundry list. Review only the attributes that will help this customer solve the problem that brought him into the market.
      • If you do not develop enough of a relationship: get too familiar too fast, and you become uncomfortable.
      • To move from meet and greet to discovery it might sound something like this "do you have any more questions about my background? If not let me begin to get an idea of what you are looking for…."
      • You earn the right to move on to the next step in the process by doing all the work in the step you now occupy. If you're unsure ask the customer. He or she will know if it is time to move on.
  • Chapter 4: Research Prior to the Sale: Identifying Hot Buttons and Flagging Landmines
    • Never make the customer do our homework for us.
    • Be clear about what you c deliver and ask the buyer to be specific about his or her expectation! Then be clear about your expectations of the customer.
    • Draws customers to our product. We want to know the hot buttons
    • Hot buttons are the product attributes that excite customers and energize them about buying your product.
    • Hot buttons are never generic
    • In the discovery portion of the sales interview our buyer will tell us the specific buttons that matter to him
    • Best way to uncover the specific landmines that apply to the sale you are chasing is to question carefully and listen closely to the answers
    • Landmines: Previous bad experience with the product you represent
      • Embarrassing fact
      • Conflict between two parties on the buying side
      • Talking to the customer far above or below their level of understanding
      • Addressing your comments to the half of a couple that you assume will make the decision and guessing wrong…you have to do your homework to find out who the decision maker will be
      • Assuming you know what has driven the customer to the marketplace
    • Where do I find out about this stuff?
      • You sell the product-what excites you about it? Literally, I mean. Don't regurgitate some crap from the sales brochures. Tell me in plain english what excites you about your product lines. It's impossible to sell something if you can't get excited about it yourself.
      • There must be some reason they have chosen yours. Find out what their reasons are and log them into your memory so you can refer to them as your sell your product.
  • Chapter 5: Meet and Greet: You Never Get a Second change to make a good first impression
    • These potential sales die because of the way salespeople meet their customers because of appearances and first impressions
    • Do you solicit input from the customers who do not buy? Or is all your feedback from the people who decided to buy?
    • The meet and greet is the only chance you have to make a good first impression
    • Many more opportunities to confirm their good judgment in choosing to work with you.
    • Sometimes we are: excited, anxious, baffled, even irritated
    • We are looking for is a sales person who authentically cares about us and about our circumstances. We seek someone who will take the time to understand the situation surrounding the purchase and walk with us through the situation to our ultimate decision. Someone we can trust
    • Trust is built on a salesperson listening to and connecting with the customer. Credibility follows trust.
    • Customers don't care how much you know until they know how much you care.
    • Our challenge is 1) to get him to envision us as the best possible soucre and supplier for solving the problem and 2) for the two of us to begin to move together down the path to the final purchase
    • Challenge of the meet and greet
      • How do I grret customers in a way that they see me as a credible colleague
      • How do I build rapport
      • How do I get customers t invite me into their problem solving process?
    • Greeting customers so they see you as a credible colleague
      • Questions you have when you are the buyer
        • Does this salesperson listen to me when I talk?
        • Is this salesperson willing to get to know me before they try to sell me? Am I human being or just another turn at bat?
        • Does this salesperson know what he or she is talking about?
          • Their own products and applications
          • Competitors products?
          • The differences between and similarities of the two
          • The advantages and disadvantages of each?
          • Does this person move the process along at a pace that feels comfortable to me?
    • Building trust through listening
      • Tell the truth the whole truth without shading it to advantage
      • Listen carefully to the customers problems
      • Question closely to ensure he or she fully understands the circumstances and buying constraints
      • Respect the customer and their desires, needs and constraints
      • Education the customer if the selling knows things that will help the buer make an informed decision
      • Partner with the customer-find a solution that works for each of them
      • Shape a solution that solves the customers problems within the constraints laid out by the customer.
    • Trust-an ideal sale, it should always precede rapport
    • Rapport is built at least in part-on overlapping interests
    • You don’t have to lie to build rapport. You and the customer already have the most important commonality you could possibly have. The customer has a problem that your product might be able to solve
    • 1)establish credibility, 2) build rapport, 3) get invited into the problem solving process
    • Cold call- sales person has to hook the prospects interest in the first thirty seconds or the first couple of minutes
    • Once oyu have the prospects attention the sales process is exactly the same as the one we have been describing
    • Difference being that you start in a one down position
    • Some people are jerks. Get used to it. Don't let it affect your interaction with the next customer.
    • Carbondum non illegitimate! Don't let the bastards get you down
      • Never say something to a customer that you wouldn't want repeated to the local television newscast
      • Put it in writing
      • Keep management in the loop
      • Refuse to sell them
      • Don't let it get you down
  • Chapter 6: Discovery: Questioning for Results
    • What brings you here today and how might I be helpful to you?
    • Open questions are the essay questions of life- they require a paragraph answer
      • Tell me about
      • Explain
      • What happened when
      • Why
      • How
      • How do you feel about
      • Open up a topic giving the salesperson a range of useful information that can be used to help craft a sale
    • Open questions are famous for opening up a topic-they ive you lots of information and have the added advantage of encouraging the customer to talk
    • Open questions can take a lot of time. Inefficient if you are dealing with someone who talks a lot
    • The best use of closed questions is often after you have gotten to know the customer
    • The purpose of the probe is to encourage the speaker to keep talking or say more about the issue at hand.
      • Are there other concerns you have about this
      • Is there anything else you'd like to add
      • What else comes to mind
      • Is that all
      • Go on
      • Tell me more
    • Types of questions you ask are critical but so is the order in which you ask them
      • From the general to the specific
      • Tepee - one or more closed questions and then opens up as the key topic comes into focus
      • Hourglass - most real. closed, open, closed
    • Category: core problem
      • If this purchase solves your problem, how will things be different
      • How do you hope that making this purchase will make things better?
    • Product specs
      • What is the single most frustrating thing about the product you will be replacing
      • How much are you now spending on maintenance
    • Price
      • How much is your budget for this purchase
      • Are you just testing the market?
      • How much did you pay for the item you will be replacing
      • How much is the current item costing you in downtime and maintenance
      • Where does price fit in the list of attributes that will help you make this decision
      • Have you considered total cost (downtime maintenance, product life, hassle - rather than front end cost as a possible way to make the decision.
    • Buying process:
      • Who else will be in making this purchase
      • When do you anticipate making the buying decision
      • What criteria will dve your purchase decision
      • If a committee is involved in the buying decision would it be possible to meet with all of them?
    • You have to frame questions that get at what you need to know and oyu have to ask the questions in a sequence that makes sense.
  • Chapter 7: Features and Benefits: The difference and why it matters
    • A feature is an attribute of a product program or service
    • A benefit is a reason for the customer to care (and to buy)
    • Salespeople are tempted to talk about features, while customers focus on-and buy- benefits
    • I spoke of features, I was talking about my product and what mattered to me
    • When I began to talk about benefits I was putting myself into the position of the buyer, talking about what mattered to him
    • Don't talk about a feature if you can't make it matter to the customer. Remember: if it doesn't matter to the customer, it doesn't matter, period.
    • Universal benefits relate to money, power, prestige, self-understanding, fear, and the other core motivators that drive all human behavior.
      • Make more money
      • Spend less money
      • Save more money
      • Have more money
      • Work less/fewer hours
      • Save time
      • Have more time off
      • Look good to others
      • Be attractive
      • Be part of a winning team
      • Work with folks I like
      • Learn something new
      • Use new technology
      • Be more productive
      • Have fewer hassles
      • Be safe
      • Be secure
      • Save time
      • Make a contribution
      • Make a difference
      • Be heard or valued
      • Avoid pain
      • Be vindicated
      • Be autonomous
      • Feel heard
      • Do competent/quality work
      • Get recognition / be a hero
      • Play more
      • Have fun!
      • Serve god
      • Serve a higher-order goal
      • Look good to myself
      • Be all I can be
      • Reduce risk
      • Be left alone
      • Minimize fear
    • Learning to Bridge
      • If you listen long enough, people will tell you how to sell them!
      • That is people will tell you what matters to them, they will tell you the problem that drove them into the market and they will tell you the purchase criteria they are looking for in the solution they seek. If we can solve the problem and provide a solution that meets all (or even most) of the purchase criteria we get the business
      • Customers often miss an important benefit that matters to them.
      • We begin with support-the underlying facts or data that prove the feature
        • Example, a document supporting the return policy
        • The policy is still a feature (not a benefit) but it is no longer an unsupported assertion
      • Making the bridge
        • We take the customer's hand and walk them from the feature across the chasm of doubt to the benefit that addresses their problem. Begin by reviewing the universal benefit list.
      • Three step process
        • Name the feature on which you are focusing
        • Support the feature with relevant facts and data
        • Bridge the universal benefit.
          • "what all these data mean to you is…"
      • How do you bridge from the features you memorized to the benefits the buyers care about?
        • Remind the customer of the problem that brought them into the market in the first place. "you mentioned that XYZ was the major concern for you."
        • State the relevant feature that will solve their problem. "this product has (features) that address the problem…"
        • Use a bridge phrase that will lead the customer from the feature of your product to the benefit that solves their problem. "What this means to you is…"
        • Lay the benefit out in plain view so the customer will not have to leap to the benefit on their own. This means that you finish the sentence begun in step 3
          • "what this means to you is that you will have fewer hassles / save more money/ etc
        • Support the benefit so that it is not an unsupported assertion. "I have (provide examples) that prove this is not just my opinion it's a fact!"
      • No problem = no sale. No solution = no sale.
    • Bridging from Features to Benefits: Solving the Customer's problem script
      • For Feature1: one feature of this product is ___. This features yields (benefit), which can be especially helpful in helping you address (state problem).
      • For feature 2: You mentioned that you have been having a problem with )state problem), and that you were particularly interested in (state benefit). This product has (state feature), which will deliver the (state benefit) you were interested in, and help you address (state problem)>
      • Feature 3: you mentioned that you have been having a problem with (problem). This product has (feature) which will deliver the (benefit) you were interested in, and help you address (problem).
      • Feature 4: one feature of this product is (feature) what this means to you is (benefit), which can be especially helpful in addressing (problem).
      • Feature 5: you mentioned that you have been having a problem with (problem). This product has (feature) which will deliver the (benefit) you were interested in, and help you address (problem).
      • Feature 6: You mentioned that (benefit) is especially important to you. We can offer you (restate benefit) because our product has (state feature). And this (restate feature) will yield (restate benefit), which will help you solve (state problem) that you say is so important to you.
  • Chapter 8: Making the Case / Presenting the Solution
    • Overall objective: to fully address the problem or problems that brought the customer to the sales interaction in the first place, and to make the case that our solution is the best solution for the customer.
    • We need to know how fully the customer is aware of his or her problem.
    • Quadrant 1: Prospect has a problem and knows it.
      • Not uncommon for customers to be aware of part of their problem but not all of it.
      • Easiest to deal with.
      • Negotiate (and solve)
    • Quadrant 2: Prospect has no problem and knows he has no problem
      • Rarely calls you or walks into your place of business.
      • Wait (and build relationship)
      • Savvy customers: keep up with markets and they know what is available.
      • Sooner or later the current supplier with screw up and then you have your shot.
    • Quadrant 3: Prospect has a problem but is not aware that he has no problem.
      • Educate (raise awareness)
      • We are raising to their awareness a problem thay have but that they did not know existed. Do a better job for themselves and for their employer
      • When the customer becomes aware of their problem they move to quadrant 1
    • Quadrant 4: Prospect has no problem but is not aware of the problem.
      • Worrywarts: think they may have a problem but it's only a hunch. They have no data.
      • Clueless: the oblivious are pretty sure they don't have a problem, but they don't really know, either, because they don't have any data and don't know they need data.
      • Give the customers data and move them from quadrant 4 to quadrant 1 so we can sell them in a straight on sale.
      • Agitate (create doubt)
      • You agitate and raise doubt about the product they are currently buying.
      • Make a case for the product: as an answer to a concern held by a worrywart or as a remedy to an issue you have raised (by agitating) with a clueless buyer.
      • Raise the problem, then solve it to make the sale.
    • Using the grid to make the sale
      • Each quadrant calls for a different strategy in making the sale. We want to do the same thing in making the case/presenting the solution that we did in presenting features and benefits to the customer. Custom tailor our presentation to the unique needs, perceptions, and circumstances of the customer with whom we are dealing.
    • We cannot sell prospective customers unless they have a problem-and they know that they have a problem. Problems that come to the surface are often shortcomings of competitive products, or of competitive suppliers.
      • Restate the problem as the customer has presented it to you. You repeat the frustrations you have heard your customers voice. "what I hear you saying is that you have had a lot of problems with (competitor or product)."
        • Beware of putting words in the prospect's mouth at this point,. Make sure you get agreement that you have restated the problem correctly.
      • Determine the frequency of the problem
      • Determine the impact of the problem
      • Assign a dollar value to the problem. So reduce their frustration to a concrete number.
        • Spin the supplier problem out in a way that makes it look as horrendous as possible.
      • Recap all you have learned about the scope, impact, and cost of the problem. This is the summary and it is critical.
      • Present your product as the solution to the problem (and get agreement) that your solution will solve their problem.
    • Pull together everything that has happened in the preceding steps.
    • Six Steps for making the case
      • Restate the problem, get the prospect to agree, asking for additions or amplifications.
      • Deal with each of the problems you have identified. Make the case that your product offers the best solution for each of the problems.
      • Always bridge from the features of your product to the benefits.
      • Repeat back anything you hear the customer saying about your solution. Deal with any concerns he or she might have
      • Tie down questions. Use to tie up all loose ends on one component of the sale before moving on to the next component.
      • Use a trial close to gauge the customers receptivity to the overall case you have made and flush out any objections.
    • Because you have established that the issue is resolved the customer is unlikely to wander back to the issue at some later point in the sale.
    • Remember to use them before you move on in making your case.
      • Do you feel like what we have talked about will solve this portion of the problem
      • How does that sound? Does it deal with the concerns you have raised
      • Do you think this will work? Why, why not?
      • Has that addressed your problem? What questions do you have? Can we move on to the next issue?
    • Trial close - assesses the prospective customer's response to the entire case you have made ("based on what I have proposed, do you think I have solved the problem and hit your objectives?")
      • What concerns do you have so far
      • Have I dealt with all the issues your brought to our meeting
      • What's left that we haven't addressed
      • How does this sound so far.
      • If your trial close flushes out an objection (and this is the most common outcome) probe and deal with the objection then circle back to a second trial close
    • Talking about price
      • Customer bought with a low price will be lost to the first supplier who comes along with an even lower price.
      • Don't lead with price. If it's beyond what the prospect thinks is reasonable they will quit listening
      • Build value before talking price. People buy to solve a problem. Sell your solution thoroughly before you hang a price tag on it.
      • Make sure any price comparison applies apples to apples
      • Don't apologize for your price, it is what it is. Your product is worth what it costs. If you don't believe it is worth what it costs, then advocate for lower prices. It is impossible to sell a product you don't believe in.
      • Make sure you continually point the customer back to you Total Value Proposition. Price, reputation, terms, opportunity. You offer best value
      • The only way the customer can work with you is to buy from you. Your job is to be good enough to make him or her want to work with you. Even if your price is higher.
  • Chapter 9: The Objective I s Objections: Dealing with Resistance
    • Rejection is just an objection on steroids.
    • The process of moving towards a decision causes the prospective customer to reexamine the problem.
    • An objection is simply a request for more information
    • Customers object for one simple reason: they do not believe that we have fully solved their problem
    • Answer the objection then move back to the sales process.
    • Process for dealing with objections
      • Pause and take a deep breath-don't panic
        • Chance to demonstrate how customer focused you are
      • Restate the objection
        • Softening the language. ("I've heard your quality stinks…so you have some concerns about quality")
      • Clarify the objection by probing
        • Gather the additional facts
        • Specific concerns (about quality, etc)
        • How do you think these concerns might play out in the use of your product
        • Do you have any data
        • Can I look at your data
        • What is the source of your information
      • Answer the objection
        • Answer their question, provide supporting evidence.
        • Don't ignore part of the objection, it will not go away
      • Get confirmation that you have dealt fully with the objection
        • Ask the customer (in plain English) if you have given them the information to answer their question
      • Transition back to the sale process.
    • Don’t panic…objection is simply a request for more information…probe it before you address it
    • Sometimes it’s a good idea to invite objections so that they get out on the table early
    • Stop periodically to check for clarity and see if the customer has questions or concerns.
    • Co-opt them well before they popup as full blown objections.
    • Questions to flush out objections
      • What concerns do you have so far
      • Is there anything about this approach that bothers you
      • When you think about this solution what are you r first thoughts.
      • Why might this solution not work in the situation you face
      • How have you seen solutions like this fail I nthe past?
    • Phony objections
      • A phony objection will be impossibly vague and amorphous
      • Or will fly in the face of the data available and the case you have already made
      • I'm just not sure
      • Let me think about it
      • I need a couple of days
      • But what about
      • Let me ask so and so
      • Treat it exactly like a regular objection, assume at the outset that it is sincere and authentic.
        • What exactly are you unsure about
        • What is it you need to think about
        • What will you know in a couple of days that you do not know now?
        • What information do you need that I have neglected to give you
        • Could you call so and so right now
        • What have I not made clear
      • Do not blame the customer for an objection-even if you think the objection is phony.
      • "I'm confused" then recap your conversation to date: the problem the customer brought in, the solution you have identified and the fact that they have agreed with you every step of the way. You recount the fact that you believe you have solved the problem and you close your conversation with "given all this, I'm confused about why you are concerned. What's up?" And then you wait.
      • "Something is missing here…" We've spent a fair amount of time together and you said I had solved your problem with the solution I just presented. Now you seem reluctant to make the purchase. Something's missing from this picture, what is it?
      • Cirlce back to discovery
      • Human beings like to choose when they buy, no one likes to be pressured into buying
      • You can't sell every customer
      • If the objection is authentic, they'll return. If not, you've saved time to pursue other more productive customers.
      • Cut price only as a last resort. It is rarely the main objection, usually the first objection.
      • Any time you are tempted to cut price, do the math. Ask yourself, is this deal going to pay out?
        • Know that your customers talk to each other, and they brag when they get a good price on anything.
        • Hard to deal with issues that arise when price cutting is undisciplined and gets out of hand.
      • If you get in trouble, probe. If you stay in trouble, call in a colleague.
        • Call in an expert who can solve the problem and position yourself as the companion who found the expert
        • Allows you to back away a little from the sales interaction. Perspective is often helpful.
    • Buying signs
      • All buying signs indicate that the customer is beginning to envision himself as the owner of the product.
      • Often deal with price, financing, availability for delivery options.
      • I want it when I want it, where I want it, and the price I wanted.
        • Can I get one exactly like this but in a different color or fabric
        • When can you make delivery
        • What apr are you charging
        • Can you deliver it today
        • How much can you adjust that price
        • I really like this one, but I have a better price from another vendor
        • This is exactly what I was looking for.
      • ASK FOR THE ORDER
    • Trial close
      • In a trial close you get agreement that something has been solved.
      • Not complex. It’s a simple matter of asking directly or obliquely "have I solved this part of your problem?"
    • An objection means the customer is listening to you and taking what you say seriously.
  • Chapter 10: Closing: It's okay to ask for the order
    • If you work the sales process faithfully, closing is the easiest step!, the sale will probably close itself.
    • Selling is a series of commitments. Get a commitment at each point in the sales process. You will have earned the right to close.
      • We have learned all about our products and about our competitors in step 1, we have made a credible first impression in step 2. we have used steps 3 and 4 to fully understand the buyer's problem and to present the key features about our product that help the solve the prospective customer's problem. We have made the case that our product will solve the prospect's problem and we have dealt with resistance as it popped up. And now we have to close, otherwise all that hard work goes to waste. If we have done our jobs up to this point, the closing will go smoothly.
    • Keep your commitments: under promise and over deliver on every commitment you make to your prospective customer. Do what you say you will do, when you said you would do it. Credibility as a problem solving partner working with the customer to solve the problem that took him into the market.
    • Seek as well as offer commitments
    • So how exactly do we close the sale and ask for the order?
      • With a simple question
      • "So , what do you think?"
      • And that's all there is to closing
      • Customer is ready to buy…"it sounds good to me"
      • If not ready to buy, will flush out objections and circle back to deal with them
      • No is an objection. go back to discovery and probe
    • Tasks immediately after the sale:
      • Celebrating with the customer in his or her relief
      • Moving immediately to allay all anxiety
      • Congratulate them on their choice and assure them you think they will "be very pleased with their choice"
      • Congratulate him or her on their good judgment in choosing to do business with you. Move immediately to allay any anxiety that could come up.
      • Recap your agreements
      • Review the benefits to the customer of decisions made (how they solve the problem)
      • Reduce all commitments to writing
    • You can close at any point in the sales process. But you have to read the cues carefully
    • You ought to always tell the truth, but you don't always have to be telling it.
    • You can close whenever the customer is ready.
  • Chapter 11: Following Up for Ongoing Profitability
    • Requires different skill set than selling itself
    • The salesperson who solves the prospective customers problems and keeps them solved gets to keep the business
    • Cost of conquest sale is 5-8 times the cost of a repeat sale
    • It’s the sale after the sale that makes you the most money
    • The second sale is far easier than the first one if the follow up has been done professionally and as promised.
    • There are lots of customers to be satisfied in doing follow up well.
    • Keep your commitments. Do what you say you will do. Under promise and over deliver. All these are admonitions designed to manage around the all to human tendency to let things slide once the sale is made.
    • Write it down!
    • Shouldn't you and the customer reduce to writing who is going to do what for whom and by when, using what resources and at what price so there is a reduced likelihood that you will disappoint each other?
    • Common Courtesy, a competitive edge
      • Common courtesy ain't near as common as it used to be
      • Thank people for their business. You'd be surprised how far that will go
      • The effectiveness of a thank you seems to have a more direct tie to the sincerity of the thank than to the dollars spent on the gesture.
      • When people put themselves out for you, they deserve to be acknowledged and thanked. Beyond that many folks expect to be thanked.
      • Relate to your customers from a position of gratitude and you will make manners a point of competitive advantage for you and your products
      • If you fail to plan then plan to fail
      • The harder I practice, the luckier I get.
    • SMART goals
      • Specific - specify exactly what you are going to achieve. Be clear with about specific goals or you will not be able to tell if you ever reached them
      • Measurable - how are you going to measure progress towards the goal.
      • Attainable - the goal needs to be tough enough to make you stretch but not so hard that you give up in frustration and quit
      • Related - relate your goals to things that matter to you. How will you benefit if you reach your goal?
      • Time based - when is the due date?
    • What are you going to sell them next?
    • To be on the lookout for the next thing you are going to sell a client
    • Just because you have made one sale and solved one problem does not mean that you have done all you can to serve the customer
    • Other ways we can make life easier for the customer by taking him or her out of the hassle business
    • What other problems can I solve for this customer
    • What else can I sell this customer
    • Don't drop the issue, raise the issue!
    • Price, quality, and functionality get you in. Response time, service, and support get you out.
    • Once onboard as a customer, our accounts assume we will continue to deliver these three things (price quality, functionality)./ and these three things alone are not enough. They got us into the arena, but they will not by themselves keep us in the game.
    • It's not quality or support. Once you get a customer, it's a both and deal: 1) price quality functionality and 2) response time, service and support
    • Listen to your customers, they will tell you their problems. They will tell you how to sell them. And they will tell you how to keep them happy.
    • The sales relationships that work best are those where each side values the other, and takes the long view of the relationship
  • Chapter 12: Final Things-Launching your sales ship for a successful voyage
    • Don't take the rejection personally
      • The rejection is not likely about you
      • So they are not rejecting you, they are rejecting your business proposition
    • Learn what you can from every rejection
    • Play the percentages
      • Every time he got a no he said to himself "I'm ten percent of the way to a yes"
      • Your closing ratio should go up over time as you become more adept at selling
    • Remember they can't hate you, they don't even know you
      • Whenever you stand up in front of the group, the group immediately breaks fown into three clusters
        • 1/3 of them immediately love you
        • 1/3 of them instantly hate you
        • 1/3 of them are open
    • You assemble a team of people who can help you grow as a salesperson, your ideal team would include each of the following.
      • A peer partner
      • Boss/sales manager
      • A mentor coach
        • You need someone outside the organization who understands the ins and outs of selling to hom you can tell the whole truth. Someone with whom you can talk about frustrations and challenges and irritations
        • Someone who will tell you the whole truth
    • Find a way to de-stress
      • Find something that gives you pleassure and discipline yourself to do that thing
      • Beware that you career doesn't eat into your de-=stressing activity
    • Build a life outside of work
      • Cultivate friendships
      • These people all know you as something other than a unit of production
    • Give yourself away
    • Connect to something beyond yourself
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